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Farewell to the Excellent, Eddie Garcia!


Though I have not worked with late veteran and multi-awarded actor-filmmaker Eddie Garcia, I still admire his passion and dedication for his craft. Perhaps the closest encounter I had with him was when we covered the launch of one of his latest films with Globe Studios, Hintayan ng Langit in November last year.

I began to like him as an actor when he played comic roles in the sex-comedy flicks May Lamok sa Loob ng Kulambo and May Daga sa Labas ng Lungga (1984). The most memorable film that I enjoyed about him the film Erpat Kong Forgets (also in 1984), written by Jose Carreon and directed by Erastheo Navoa.

A scene from Erpat Kong Forgets 3

Garcia is seen with Muhlach in a hospital scene from the film ‘Erpat Kong Forgets’.

In the said film, Garcia was the father of Aga Muhlach‘s character as Ariel who fell in love with Janice de Belen‘s Josephine (the sister) of the Carmi Martin‘s role. He’s undeniably great in drama, comedy, and action. Whether he’s the protagonist and the antagonist, he is effective in both.  

A scene from Erpat Kong Forgets 5

The tandem of Aga Muhlach and Janice de Belen was born through the film ‘Erpat Kong Forgets’.

A scene from Erpat Kong Forgets

Carmi Martin was Garcia’s love interest in ‘Erpat Kong Forgets’.

Apart from Hintayin Kita sa Langit, his two other latest award-winning films Rainbow Sunset and ML (Martial Law) were testaments of how exemplary he was. He was named 42nd Gawad Urian best actor for the latter film, given by the Manunuri ng Pelikulang Pilipino (the Filipino Film Critics).

The cause of his death may not be something that the TV industry can take pride in. He met his fatal accident on the set of a taping for a series. He breathed his last breath on June 20, almost two weeks of fighting to survive. What is admirable about Garcia, he died working for his passion and never faltered on his commitment.

Rest in peace Eduardo Verchez Garcia (Born on 2 May 1929 – Died on 20 June 2019).

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Piolo Pascual: Perfect Personality to endorse Pure Organic Barley Powder Drink


At 41, Piolo Jose Nonato Pascual or better known as PJ or Piolo in Philippine local industry is a film and television actor-singer-model-and producer—is just the perfect personality to represent IAM Worldwide’s Amazing Barley.

Untitled design (2)

Pascual is perhaps the local counterpart of American actor-producer Brad Pitt. He’s oozing with those irresistible looks even with his age that could be comparable to a wine; he who has aged good and has gotten better (like how wine tastes better over the years); he gets even better reputation because of his achievements.

Staying as a sought-after personality is a challenge that Pascual has learned to embrace. Being part of the entertainment circuit, he has to keep himself in great shape by hitting the gym regularly as well as taking the needed supplements that his body needs. Even with his hectic schedules, he still manages to do some physical activities.

Pascual is the New Face of Pure Organic Barley

Piolo Pascual posed with IAMWORLDWIDE bigwigs prior to signing his contract with the said health powder drink brand. Photograph courtesy of Kate Adajar.

On December 3, at I’M Hotel in Makati, Piolo signed a contract with IMWORLDWIDE to seal his endorsement for Herb-all Amazing Pure Organic Barley.

The said health supplement drink is just one of the many products distributed by IAMWORLDWIDE and it is made from the purest Australian young Barley grass. It contains many health benefits such as strengthening the immune system, cleansing and detoxifying the body as well as regenerate damage cells and tissues. Such product is a reflection of what sort of countenance Pascual has.

For more information about the product, visit IAMWORLDWIDE Official Website.

 

How do You Draw Love in the Middle of War?


Despite being an animated film, this story written by Sunao Katabuchi-Chie Uratani, which is based on the manga titled—‘In This Corner of the World’ by Fumiyo Kōno definitely provides its audience the kind of drama set in the 1930s-1940s wartime in Hiroshima and Kure in Japan, roughly 10 years before and after the horrific atomic bombing.

In this Corner of the World

In the film, a young woman named Suzu, innocent and is fond of drawing; she lived in a seaside town called Eba in Hiroshima City. At 18 years of age she married Shūsaku, an earnest and quiet man; who worked as a judicial officer at the military court in Kure.

Suzu opted to live with Shūsaku in Kure City. Her husband lived with his family located on a hillside in the suburbs of Kure, with a view of the Japanese Naval Fleet in the harbor, including the largest battleships, Yamato and Musashi. Suzu enjoys touching nature and viewing warships moving on the sea with her niece, Harumi.

One day, a navy sailor named Tetsu comes to see Suzu. He was her childhood friend, now assigned to the Japanese cruiser Aoba stationed in Kure. During the night, Shūsaku allowed Tetsu and Suzu to be alone with each other; thinking that it might be the last time for the two to see each other for war is on. Little did he know that Suzu and Tetsu loved each other and professed their feelings toward each other. They copulated that night as well.

In the springtime, Shūsaku is drafted by the Navy and temporarily quartered with troops in Otake City, 40 miles away from Kure.

As mentioned in the film’s logline—‘torn apart by war’—the relationship between Shūsaku and Suzu were also falling apart. It even got worst when the U.S. army began its air raids on the Japanese mainland, in Kure. In July, urban areas of Kure are firebombed and mostly burnt down. Suzu is nearly killed by a U.S. low-level strafing run, but saved by Shūsaku. But the inevitable tragedy happened—Suzu lost her brother Yōichi, her niece Harumi, and her right arm—the one she used to draw the things she sees and imagine. She suffered in depression, and planned to return to the relative safety of her hometown (Eba) in Hiroshima City in time for the local summer festival on August 6. But on the morning of that day, a huge and marvelous cloud was rolling up over the mountain from the direction of Hiroshima City. The atomic bombing horribly destroyed countless humans and buildings in Hiroshima City.

It distraught Suzu. Probably, anyone who find himself or herself in a similar situation as Suzu—one will definitely be in a nervous breakdown.

Watching the film will also open the viewers’ eyes on the perils of war. One can ask: ‘How do You Draw Love in the Middle of War?’

After the war, Shūsaku found a new job and began a new life with Suzu, again. The latter regained her motivation to get through life and still draw love for herself and others.

Directed by Sunao Katabuchi, featuring character designs by Hidenori Matsubara and music by Kotringo—it vividly captured the episodes and background of the story are based on facts and real incidents—the lost townscape of pre-war Hiroshima, the damaged Hiroshima due to the atomic bombing; accurately supported by old photos, documents, and the memories of living people.

Suzu’s battled the horrors of war and her depression, which the moviegoers can surely empathized with.

Now showing in theaters, catch it soon.

In 2016, The film won in the following awards—Hiroshima Peace Film Award (3rd Hiroshima International Film Festival) and Best Film (38th Yokohama Film Festival).

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